Posts Tagged ‘sculpture’

New collection: Gothic Past

February 22, 2012

The Department of History of Art and Architecture, Trinity College Dublin has developed an open-access resource for the study of medieval Irish architecture and sculpture called Gothic Past. Funded by the Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences (IRCHSS), it highlights three major photograph research collections at Trinity College: the Stalley Collection, the Edwin Rae Collection and the Moulding Profiles Collection. The images making up Gothic Past have been a primary resource for investigations carried out as part of Reconstructions of the Gothic Past, a thematic research project carried out in the Department of History of Art and Architecture at Trinity College from 2008 -2011. The project monograph will be published in 2012 by Wordwell Books.

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Christo’s ‘Over the River’ blocked again

February 2, 2012

Christo’s  project to install 5.9 miles of fabric over 42-miles of the Arkansas River has been dealt another set-back. From the start,“Over the River” has had a number of detractors, most expressing concern over the potential environmental risks posed by the installation. The Colorado Wildlife Commission voted in May against the project. It wasn’t until November that the Bureau of Land Management actually gave “Over the River” permission to move forward.

The latest block comes from University of Denver law students suing on behalf of Rags Over the Arkansas River (ROAR), a group concerned with the environmental dangers that could result from such a large scale project in a sensitive area.  They describe themselves as an organization “dedicated to preserving and protecting the headwaters of the Arkansas River, the Bighorn Sheep Canyon, its inhabitants and the communities that depend upon them. Our founding project has been to formally oppose Christo and Jeanne Claude’s “Over the River” project. This project involves suspending horizontal fabric panels within a 45 mile stretch over the Arkansas River’s Bighorn Sheep Canyon. Hence the name ‘Rags Over the Arkansas River.'”

Christo, who is hoping to complete “Over the River” in August 2014, is required to put several mitigation measures into place for local wildlife including bighorn sheep and birds. (source: “University of Denver Law Students Sue to Block Christ’s ‘Over the River’ Project,” Huffington Post)

Occupy images

December 2, 2011

The Occupy Movement that started at Wall Street has quickly spread around the globe, aided in part by the vivid, compelling and, at times, chilling images produced by participants or (citizen) journalists. The Occupy Movement is also actively producing and syndicating some pretty amazing protest posters for distribution among its various movements through a site called OCCUPRINT: Posters form the Occupy Movement. Occupy participants can submit and share their own creations. Occuprint has established a PrintLab to generate prints for use in the protest movement (not to generate money — all prints are free).

The Visual Resources Facility has also documented the art and architecture produced by UC Davis Occupy. In our image catalog,  you can see the memorial produced by Robin Hill and her students at the campus rally (November 21) and the UC Davis encampment aka Quad Village.

Welcome back!

September 22, 2011

Welcome back everyone! Sadly, our too-short summer break has ended but there is plenty to look forward to during the 2011-2012 academic year. This Fall Quarter, you can check out the Art History Colloquium “Art Between Europe & Asia in the First Age of Global Trade” on Friday, September 30th at 3:00 pm (see previous post).  Other events include “Birds: A Kinetic Installation” at the Nelson Gallery, opening on September 29 and running through December 11. “Birds” will display the computer-driven kinetic sculpture of Brooklyn-based artist Chico MacMurtrie. The Design Museum, relocated to Creuss Hall, will present the installation work of Robert Gaylor in “Gyre, A Grand Tragedy of the Commons” (October 10 to December 2). And stayed tuned for the annual Art Studio Visiting Artist Series which will be start this Fall Quarter. More information to come when we get it.

This was a busy summer in the VRF but we did manage to add new material to online catalog. For example, we added gorgeous images of the Modena and Parma Cathedrals taken by Lisa Zdybel last spring, and photos of “Crested Oak,” a site-specific sculpture created by landscape architecture student John Gainey for the Arboretum. Our hours remain the same as usual — Fall Quarter hours are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm Monday through Thursday and Friday by appointment. We hope to see you in the VRF soon.

The latest on the Spiral Jetty

August 11, 2011

Artnet News announced yesterday that the Dia Foundation is finalizing an agreement with the Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands over the lease of the 10-acres of state owned land on which Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty is situated. The Dia is establishing a Special Use Lease with Utah after its 20-year lease expired in February amid rumors that the foundation failed to make payments and was on the verge of loosing control of the seminal earthwork.
The issue of ownership and control of the iconic earthwork is a fascinating study in itself. If you want to read more, go to the Salt Lake Tribune (June 23, 2011 and July 22, 2011) , the Hyperallergic blog (June 14, 2011 and August 6, 2011) and Artinfo.

Take a tour of the original Barnes Foundation

July 12, 2011

The amazing collection of Impressionist and early modernist painting and sculpture making up the Barnes Foundation will be leaving its original home in Merion, PA and moving to its new home in Philadelphia next May.  After a long fought battle, the foundation managed to over-ride its original charter and bylaws established by the pharmaceutical tycoon Albert C. Barnes in the early 1920s which stated that none of the collection’s paintings or sculptures could be sold, lent or moved from the original gallery walls. To many, the quirky and idiosyncratic way in which Barnes displayed his collection — “antiquated-looking salon style that filled entire walls of its neo-Classical home with odd arrangements of paintings, organized to echo and rhyme their formal qualities and interspersed with decorative metalwork like ax heads and hinges” [New York Times] — made the Barnes Foundation such a fabulous and unusual institution. Happily for those of us who have never had the opportunity to visit the original galleries, the New York Times has produced a virtual tour of its many highlights. To read more about the tour and the Barnes Foundation, click here for the full article.

You can read more about the new building designed by architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien here.

Latest additions to ARTstor

June 22, 2011

Bragg House, Carnegie Survey

In collaboration with the Library of Congress, ARTstor is releasing 6,884 documentary photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnston from the Carnegie Survey of the Architecture of the South. With support from the Carnegie Corporation in 1933-1940, Johnston (1864-1952) photographed buildings and gardens in nine Southern states in an attempt to document disappearing antebellum architecture.

Dolores Zorreguieta, Wounds, in Franklin Furnace Collection

ARTstor has also collaborated with Franklin Furnace, an organization founded in 1976 by Martha Wilson to promote ephemeral art forms. ARTstor will add 3,345 images of artists’ books, performance art, site-specific works, and other time-based ephemeral arts. For more information on Franklin Furnace, go here.

The Warburg Institute, founded in 1921 to study the influence of the classical tradition in Western arts, is now sharing 10,000 images of Renaissance and Baroque book illustrations from their rare book collection.
In addition to these available collections, ARTstor has just signed several new collection agreements. Soon to be added:
Via Lucas will contribute 2,000 images of medieval Christian churches in France and Spain
• The Justin and Barbara Kerr collection will add 500 still and rollout images of Maya Pre-Colombian vases and artifacts

In-depth study of the Ara Pacis

May 4, 2011

The Ara Pacis Augustae (Altar of Augustan Peace), a famous Roman monument constructed in 13-9 BCE during the reign of Augustus, is the subject of a new, expansive web publication by Charles Rhyne. Rhyne, Professor Emeritus from Reed College, produced his site to make “available a more comprehensive body of images of the Ara Pacis than previously available in print or web publication.” His web publication includes high quality images as well as in-depth documentation on the altar, its restorations and now the recently constructed new museum — Museo dell’Ara Pacis — housing the monument (Richard Meier and Partners, 2006).

UCD art major wins “Next Generation”

April 25, 2011

Stephanie Lin, an art studio major here at UCD, took first place at the De Young Museums “New Generations” exhibition for her sculpture “Burn.”  Lin developed “Burn” through her studies in exploring a single material. Congratulations Stephanie!

Buddhist relics in danger in Mes Aynak, Afghanistan

April 7, 2011

According to Art Newspaper, the world’s largest archaeological excavation is underway as archaeologist attempt to rescue ancient Buddhist monasteries in Mes Aynak, Afghanistan before the site is turned into an open-cast mine.  The site, a former training camp for Osama bin Laden, is now leased to a mining company in China and, at $3 billion, is the largest business opportunity in Afghanistan’s history.  The Buddhist monasteries date from the 3rd to 7th centuries. Archaeologists have uncovered a 260 foot walled complex with a stupa, a 25 foot reclining Buddha and wall paintings. Recovered artifacts are being moved to the National Museum in Kabul for conservation. Mining is scheduled for 2014.
For additional information on the excavations at Mes Aynak, visit Penn Museum Blog.