Posts Tagged ‘manuscripts’

Sexy Codicology — they code for the love of codices!

April 20, 2017

What is Sexy Codicology? An independent project that aims to expand interest and awareness of medieval illuminated manuscripts to the widest audience possible through social media. They discover and explore digitized special collections around the world, hunting for beautiful illuminated manuscripts which they share on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Tumblr and Pinterest as well as their blog Sexy Codicology. They have also developed Maps of Digitized Medieval Manuscripts Available Online and Codicology where they explain the basics of the various types of manuscripts. And they have developed a manuscript app — the DMMapp — that links to more than 500 libraries in the world from which users can browse digitized manuscripts. DMMapp is open source and always looking for contributions in its development as well as additional library collections for new content.

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Aberdeen Bestiary online

November 16, 2016

The Aberdeen Bestiary (MS 24), considered one of the finest medieval examples of the illuminated manuscript, is now available online thanks to Aberdeen University’s decades long effort to make the ms-24entire manuscript publicly available. Access to high-resolution images have given historians a close look at its gorgeous illuminations as well as a new perspective on the history and construction of the manuscript: imperfections now visible indicate numerous  scribes took part in its creation; notes and instructions between  scribes are visible in margins; thumb prints reveal frequent use as a teaching tool. In addition to the high resolution images, transcripts and translations of the original Latin text are available.

Read more about the project on the University Aberdeen project site and in a review of the project by Hyperallergic.

Vatican to digitize Manuscripts

April 8, 2014

Stamp.Ross.283

Stamp.Ross.283

With funding from the Polonsky Foundation, the Vatican is planning on digitize its entire Ancient Manuscript collection. Last year, the Vatican and the Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford collaborated on a massive digitization project to make 1.5 million manuscript pages from their collections accessible online. This huge endeavor is known as the Polonsky Foundation Digitization Project. And now another sponsor (NTT Data) has stepped forward, enabling the Vatican to digitize all 82,000 manuscripts in its 135 collections — 41 million pages in all!

Read the Vatican press release here.

Latest additions to ARTstor

June 22, 2011

Bragg House, Carnegie Survey

In collaboration with the Library of Congress, ARTstor is releasing 6,884 documentary photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnston from the Carnegie Survey of the Architecture of the South. With support from the Carnegie Corporation in 1933-1940, Johnston (1864-1952) photographed buildings and gardens in nine Southern states in an attempt to document disappearing antebellum architecture.

Dolores Zorreguieta, Wounds, in Franklin Furnace Collection

ARTstor has also collaborated with Franklin Furnace, an organization founded in 1976 by Martha Wilson to promote ephemeral art forms. ARTstor will add 3,345 images of artists’ books, performance art, site-specific works, and other time-based ephemeral arts. For more information on Franklin Furnace, go here.

The Warburg Institute, founded in 1921 to study the influence of the classical tradition in Western arts, is now sharing 10,000 images of Renaissance and Baroque book illustrations from their rare book collection.
In addition to these available collections, ARTstor has just signed several new collection agreements. Soon to be added:
Via Lucas will contribute 2,000 images of medieval Christian churches in France and Spain
• The Justin and Barbara Kerr collection will add 500 still and rollout images of Maya Pre-Colombian vases and artifacts

The Dead Sea Scrolls go online

October 31, 2010

AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner

Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) and Google are collaborating to upload newly digitized images of the 2,000 year old biblical texts known as the Dead Sea Scrolls.  Dating from the third century B.C.E. to the first century C.E., the Dead Sea Scrolls contain the earliest known copies of the Hebrew Bible. Digital copies as good as or even clearer than the original texts will support continued scholarship and protect the original, fragile fragments of parchment and papyrus from further exposure. The project began over two years ago but the development of a new digital imaging process that captures various wavelengths in the highest resolution possible will be in IAA labs soon. IAA expects the first version to go online within six months. Read more and see the project in action.