Posts Tagged ‘digital imaging & technology’

Aberdeen Bestiary online

November 16, 2016

The Aberdeen Bestiary (MS 24), considered one of the finest medieval examples of the illuminated manuscript, is now available online thanks to Aberdeen University’s decades long effort to make the ms-24entire manuscript publicly available. Access to high-resolution images have given historians a close look at its gorgeous illuminations as well as a new perspective on the history and construction of the manuscript: imperfections now visible indicate numerous  scribes took part in its creation; notes and instructions between  scribes are visible in margins; thumb prints reveal frequent use as a teaching tool. In addition to the high resolution images, transcripts and translations of the original Latin text are available.

Read more about the project on the University Aberdeen project site and in a review of the project by Hyperallergic.

Nationalmuseum releases 3,000 images on Wikimedia Commons

October 13, 2016

The Nationalmuseum Stockholm is making 3,000 high-resolution images of its most popular artworks available for free download on wikimedia_commons_3000_images_501x250Wikimedia Commons. Because the Nationalmuseum is currently closed for renovation, only a small part of the collections is accessible to the public. “To provide more opportunity for people to enjoy its artworks, the museum embarked last year on a joint project with Wikimedia Sweden. As a result, high-resolution images of some 3,000 paintings from the collections are now available for download on Wikimedia Commons as public domain. This means they are part of our shared cultural heritage and can be freely used for any purpose. The images are also now zoomable, but not currently downloadable, in Nationalmuseum’s online database.

Link to images on Wikipedia Commons

Digital Scrolling Painting Project

May 24, 2016

Handscrolls, often fragile and difficult to handle and display because of their large format, are rarely shown in public and in their entirety.  These same qualities also makes them impossible to reproduce faithfully for teaching purposes. The Center for the Art of East Asia is hoping to change that by making a few valuable handscrolls more accessible and visible through its Digital Scrolling Paintings Project.
scroll project
Designed to support the teaching of classes on East Asian painting, the Digital Scrolling Painting Project developed digital scrolling technology to simulate the viewing experience lacking in classes that rely on reproductions which distort the sequential and participatory nature of the handscroll viewing process. In collaboration with the Humanities Computing, the Center for the Art of East Asia developed its digital scrolling technology to simulate the viewing experience and to improve understanding of handscroll paintings. The scrolling paintings website has been designed with interactive elements to allow unprecedented accessibility to the complete works of art for educators, students and researchers.

Viewers can search and browse a selection of scrolls from the Art Institute of Chicago, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Nelson-Atkins Museum. the St. Louis Art Museum, the Smart Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and the Palace Museum of Beijing.

Freer and Sackler Galleries release entire collection online

January 27, 2015

Ondigitization January 1, the Freer and Sackler Galleries released their complete digitized collection online. More than 40,000 works from the Smithsonian’s Asian and American art museums are now available, with more than 90 percent of the images available in high resolution and without copyright restrictions for noncommercial use. The Freer and Sackler Galleries are the first of the Smithsonian Museums to release their entire collection online. The project required 6,000 staff hours in the past year, 10 terabytes of data, and 50,000 images. Rapid Capture Pilot Project was utilized to quickly digitize the enormous collection of objects.

The Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery contain some of the most important holdings of Asian art in the world. They also house Whistler’s Peacock Room, numerous Whistler paintings, drawings and prints, as well as works by Whistler’s contemporaries. You can search this amazing collection here.

Take a virtual tour of ancient Athens

November 4, 2014

Culturplay, a gaming software studio devoted to promoting cultural heritage through playfuVTA-erecthionl learning, has collaborated with the Acropolis Restoration Service (YSMA) to develop the Virtual Tour of the Acropolis and Athens 5th Century. The Virtual Tour of the Acropolis is composed of high-resolution gigapixel images and panoramas of the Athenian monuments. In addition to detailed photographs, you will find descriptive information and maps helping you orient yourself on the acropolis. Athens 5th Century is a “political and philosophical strategy game that builds upon an intuitive simulation of ancient Greece.” Learn more about the game here.

‘How Dropbox Knows When You’re Sharing Copyrighted Stuff’

November 4, 2014

logo-vflme-GvgGreg Kumparak has written an interesting article explaining how Dropbox blocks users from sharing copyrighted materials.

Vatican to digitize Manuscripts

April 8, 2014

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Stamp.Ross.283

With funding from the Polonsky Foundation, the Vatican is planning on digitize its entire Ancient Manuscript collection. Last year, the Vatican and the Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford collaborated on a massive digitization project to make 1.5 million manuscript pages from their collections accessible online. This huge endeavor is known as the Polonsky Foundation Digitization Project. And now another sponsor (NTT Data) has stepped forward, enabling the Vatican to digitize all 82,000 manuscripts in its 135 collections — 41 million pages in all!

Read the Vatican press release here.

Getty’s Open Content

August 12, 2013

The Getty has banner_opencontent_600announced that it is lifting restrictions on the use of images to which the Getty holds all the rights or are in the public domain. According to Getty President and CEO Jim Cuno, “the Getty makes available, without charge, all available digital images to which the Getty holds all the rights or that are in the public domain to be used for any purpose.”  The Open Content Program will make approximately 4600 images of paintings, drawings, manuscripts, photographs, antiquities and sculpture and decorative arts from the J. Paul Getty Museum available in high resolution on the Getty’s Search Gateway for use without restriction. The Getty plans to add other images, until eventually all applicable Getty-owned or public domain images are available, without restrictions, online.

On the Open Content Program’s website, the Getty explains their decision: “we recognized the need to share images of works of art in an unrestricted manner, freely, so that all those who create or appreciate art—scholars, artists, art lovers, and entrepreneurs—will have greater access to high-quality digital images for their studies and projects. Art inspires us, and imagination and creativity lead to artistic expressions that expand knowledge and understanding. The Getty sincerely hopes that people will use the open content images for a wide range of activities and that they will share the fruits of their labors with others.

To learn more, you can read the Getty press release here, the Open Content Program site and their announcement on IRIS, the Getty’s blog.

The perfect Pinterest picture

June 5, 2013

Aunt Peggy's Cucumber SaladWhat’s the most popular picture on Pinterest? It’s not a cute kitten or puppy. It’s not a celebrity or a beautiful sunset. No, it’s Aunt Peggy’s Cucumber, Tomato, and Onion Salad. Read more about image optimization in Pinterest and Instagram here. Note: “Aunt Peggy’s Cucumber, Tomato, and Onion Salad” recipe not included.

ImageNet

November 20, 2012

The Internet provides us with a mountain of digital images from which you can find just about anything you are looking for.  Sometimes, but not always. Why? Because an image can be found on the Internet only if the text entered by a searcher matches the text used to label it.  To help organize this heap of digital confusion, computer scientists at Stanford and Princeton are working on the world’s largest visual database that mimics the human vision system. The database called ImageNet is organized around hierarchical categories called the WordNet. Each category (node) is represented by hundreds or thousands of images — on the average over 500 images per node. ImageNet utilizes Mechanical Turk workers to identify and categorize images. At the moment, ImageNet has over 14,000,000 images indexed into nearly 22,000 categories.
For more on ImageNet, read “Seeking a Better Way to Find Web Images” (New York Times, November 19, 2012)