Posts Tagged ‘books’

Latest additions to ARTstor

June 22, 2011

Bragg House, Carnegie Survey

In collaboration with the Library of Congress, ARTstor is releasing 6,884 documentary photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnston from the Carnegie Survey of the Architecture of the South. With support from the Carnegie Corporation in 1933-1940, Johnston (1864-1952) photographed buildings and gardens in nine Southern states in an attempt to document disappearing antebellum architecture.

Dolores Zorreguieta, Wounds, in Franklin Furnace Collection

ARTstor has also collaborated with Franklin Furnace, an organization founded in 1976 by Martha Wilson to promote ephemeral art forms. ARTstor will add 3,345 images of artists’ books, performance art, site-specific works, and other time-based ephemeral arts. For more information on Franklin Furnace, go here.

The Warburg Institute, founded in 1921 to study the influence of the classical tradition in Western arts, is now sharing 10,000 images of Renaissance and Baroque book illustrations from their rare book collection.
In addition to these available collections, ARTstor has just signed several new collection agreements. Soon to be added:
Via Lucas will contribute 2,000 images of medieval Christian churches in France and Spain
• The Justin and Barbara Kerr collection will add 500 still and rollout images of Maya Pre-Colombian vases and artifacts

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New resources at Shields Library

May 17, 2011

Our always helpful librarian at Shields Library, Dan Goldstein, emailed us a list of books just added to the Harvest catalog. Here are a few highlights:
The Villa of the Papyri at Herculaneum : archaeology, reception, and digital reconstruction (Shields Library DG70.H5 V56 2010); The art of tomorrow (N6497 .A78 2010); The vorticists : manifesto for a modern world (N6768.5.V6 V678 2010); Forced journeys : artists in exile in Britain c.1933-45 (N6768 .F68 2009); Undercurrents : experimental ecosystems in recent art (N6498.E26 U54 2010); Abitare : 50 years of design : the best of architecture, interiors, fashion, travel, trends (NK1390 .A25 2010); Stephen Gill, Coming up for air (TR655 .G57 2010); Ivan Vartanian, See/Saw : connections between Japanese art then and now (N7350 .V37 2011); Contemporary art in Asia : a critical reader (N7260 .C627 2011); Mazaar, Bazaar : design and visual culture in Pakistan (NC998.6.P18 M38 2009); Atlas of world interior design (NK1990 .A85 2011); Russell Abraham, California cool : residential modernism reborn (NA7235.C2 A37 2010); Representing slavery : art, artefacts and archives in the collections of the National Maritime Museum (HT985 .R46 2007); Art and phenomenology (N70 .A775 2011); Holger Hoock, Empires of the imagination : politics, war and the arts in the British world, 1750-1850 (DA485 .H66 2010); Kathleen Ashley, Being a pilgrim : art and ritual on the medieval routes to Santiago; Ansel Adams, Unseen Ansel Adams : photographs from the Fiat Lux Collection (TR655 .A323 2010).

AND please take a look at Dan’s “Digital Images” finding aids site. It’s full of really helpful links to licensed and freely available image resources for students and scholars working in the humanities. This is a great campus resource.

Will Smarthistory replace Art History textbooks?

November 24, 2010

SmarthistoryMost art history students are painfully aware that Gardners Art Through the Ages and Stokstad’s Art History are some of the largest and heaviest textbooks around.  Wouldn’t it be nice not to have to lug those hefty books in your backpack? Art Historians Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s Smarthistory may provide some relief. Smarthistory is a free, open, not-for-profit online art history textbook that utilizes multimedia (video, maps, Flickr photos, vi.sualize.us, links and more) to present what they call and “unscripted conversations between art historians about the history of art.” Their use of multimedia and clever text to engage their audience may explain why smarthistory.org is becoming increasingly popular among art history students.

Why art books won’t become e-books any time soon

October 19, 2010

Jim Lewis argues that “Kindles, iPads, and the like will soon be the dominant medium—if, indeed, they aren’t already.  As a novelist this bothers me not at all. But novels and nonfiction aren’t the only things that come in book form. Unless you’re very dedicated, and very well-traveled, most of the art and photography you’ve seen has been on the printed page as well. Will these, too, gradually be replaced with e-books? I suspect not.” Read the entire article (“iPad, Meet Your Nemesis: Why art books won’t become e-books any time soon,” Slate, October 7, 2010).

Early graphic novels republished

October 18, 2010

Between 1929 and 1937, engraver and illustrator Lynd Ward (1905-1985) produced what some consider to be the first American graphic novels.  These wordless novels have just been republished as Six Novels in Woodcuts by The Library of America in a 2-volume set, edited and introduced by Art Spiegelman, creator of the Pulitzer Prize winning graphic novel Maus.  Steven Heller writes a great review of this new release in the New York Times Book Review (October 10, 2010).