Posts Tagged ‘art history’

Why your Art History class may be the most important class you take

February 6, 2017

In “The Art of learning: Why art history might be the most important subject you could study today,” Art historian Noah Charney argues that the study of art history and a humanities-based education is more important than ever.  The emphasis placed on the study of STEM subjects can diminish the perceived value of the humanities major, leading some to view these disciplines as purely whimsical and unpractical. In fact, Charney points to John Berger and his groundbreaking book Ways of Seeing to show how Art history develops the skills that increase critical thinking which are especially important in this age of fake news and alternative facts.

Read the entire article here.

New Directions in Medieval European and Islamic Art

February 20, 2013

New Directions The Art History Program invites you to the New Directions in Medieval and Islamic Art symposium on Friday, March 8th. Organized and moderated by Art History’s ACLS New Faculty Fellow Seth Hindin, New Directions includes young scholars from throughout Northern California.

Complete schedule:
2:00-2:10: Introduction by Seth Adam Hindin (ACLS New Faculty Fellow, UC Davis)
2:10-2:40: Beatrice Kitzinger (Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Stanford), “On Medieval Figures of Progress and Change”
2:40-3:10: Asa Mittman (Associate Professor, Chico State), “In the Cold Land of Bizo: Expelling Jews on Medieval Maps”
3:10-3:40: Patricia Blessing (Visiting Lecturer, Stanford), “Architecture, Space, and the Body in Medieval Anatolia”
3:40-4:10: Beate Fricke (Assistant Professor, UC Berkeley), “Crafts of Blood and Shapes of Life”
4:10-4:30: Q&A period
An informal reception with the speakers will follow in the lobby of the Art Building.

Additional sponsors include the Medieval and Early Modern Studies Program, the Department of Religious Studies, the Department of French and Italian, the Classics Program, the Middle East/South Asian Studies Program, and the Davis Humanities Institute.

2nd Annual Alan Templeton Colloquium

September 27, 2012

Join us for the Art History Program’s 2nd Annual Alan Templeton Colloquium “Japanese Art and Its Contexts.” This colloquium will be held Friday, October 5th at 2:00 pm in the Art Annex. Andreas Marks, Director and Chief Curator of the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture in Hanford, California, will talk about “Hiroshige’s Famous Tokaido Series: Its True Sources;” David Gundry, Assistant Professor at UCD, will discuss The Life of an Amorous Man (1682) in his talk, “Hell Hath No Fury: Text and Image in a Pivotal Chapter of Ihara Saikaku’s The Life of an Amorous Man;”  Joseph Sorensen, Associate Professor at UCD, will explore the poetic knowledge of Hosokawa Yusai in his paper “Secret Teachings, Hidden Meanings: The Samurai Scholar Hosokawa Yusai;” and Jeffrey Ruday, Professor at UCD, will show how ceramics provide a unique case for understanding differences between eighteenth-century japonaiseries and nineteenth-century japonisme, and the role of japonisme in the Design Reform movement in “Japonaiserie & Japonisme: Two Sides of Orientalism.”

The colloquium has been made possible by the generous support of Alan Templeton (UC Davis alum 1982), and by the Art History Program, the Program in East Asian Studies and the Department in East Asian Languages and Cultures.

Art History MA candidate symposium

May 21, 2012

This Friday (May 25th), the UC Davis Art History Program will hold its annual MA candidate symposium under the title “Aesthetics and Affects in Ages of Crisis.” Six candidates will present their final thesis research:

Sheena Campbell: “Little Venus in a Blue Armchair: Reclaiming Mary Cassatt’s Avant-Garde Gambit”
Monica Butler: “Chinese Painting Translated: Lang Jingsan’s Composite Photographs and the Creation of a Modern Chinese Art, 1934-1949”
Kamal Zargar: “Art as Power: Exhibitions of the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art 1999-2005/2009-2012”
Nicoletta Rousseva: “A Parallel Space, A Common Space: Rethinking Sovereignty through the Work of Alban Muja”
Geoffrey Wildanger: “Andrea Fraser and the Affects of Catastrophe”
Anne-Catherine Titus: “Paul Delaroche’s ‘Execution of Lady Jane Grey’: Restaging History”

The symposium will be held in the Art Annex (TCS Building), Main Room from 1-4 pm. This event is free and open to the public. Symposium poster available here.

Congratulations 2012 MA graduates!

Yale Art History Professor reduces class size because of WiFi

January 31, 2012

Normally, Professor Alexander Nemerov’s popular course “Introduction to the History of Art: Renaissance to the Present” attracts crowds of 500 students. Now, his classes are capped at 270. Why? Nemerov wanted a classroom where students don’t have access to WiFi and can’t surf the internet. “In the past many students in the lecture were doing Facebook or email or all kinds of things on their computers,” Nemerov said. “So for me it’s better if there’s a room where that is not possible, and one of the unfortunate effects of that is that I have to limit the enrollment of the class to the capacity of the auditorium.”

Art History colloquium: September 30th

September 22, 2011

Join us for the Art History Program’s colloquium “Art Between Europe & Asia in the First Global Age of Trade.” This colloquium will be held Friday, September 30th at 3:00 pm in Art 217. Timothy Brook, chair in Chinese Research at the Institute of Asian Research, University of British Columbia, will present “China on Vermeer’s Table: The Cultural Impact of Early Global Trade” and Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann, Frederick Marquand Professor of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University, will address “Reflections on World Art History.” The colloquium has been made possible by the generous support of Alan Templeton (UC Davis alum 1982), and by the Art History Program, the  Davis Humanities Institute, the Department of East Asian Studies and the Mellon Initiative in Early Modern Studies.

The VRF has some copies of material written by Brook and Kaufmann for review as well as their CVs. You may also want listen to this podcast interview of Brook by Russ Roberts on EconTalk.  For a flyer, click here. For more information, contact Jeffrey Ruda, Chair, Art History Program.

Visiting the Art and Art History Masters’ shows will improve your health

May 25, 2011

A recent study in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health concluded that men who participate in cultural activities, such as visiting museums and attending the ballet, are happier and healthier. Finally, it pays to be artsy.

And with perfect timing, our Art History and Art Studio Masters candidates are here to help you along your path to well-being. This week, the Art History Program will hold its annual MA candidate symposium, Constructing Identity: Image and Ownership, this Friday, May 27 from 1:30 to 5 pm in Art 217. Boghan Damian, Andrea Lesovsky, Graham McLean, Brittany McKinney, Melissa Gustin, Kristen Koch, Crystal Fountain and Nick Nabas will present their final thesis research.

The following Friday, June 3 from 5:30 to 7:30 pm marks the opening of the Art Studio MFA thesis exhibition, The House of Other at the Richard L Nelson Gallery. The show will feature the work of Jen Cohen, Lisa Rybovich Cralle, Manuel Fernando Rios, Matthew Taylor, Paul Taylor and Mathew Zefeldt.

Congratulations to our 2011 MA and MFA graduates! Both events are free and open to the public and are guaranteed to increase your fitness levels and maybe even turn-around a bad hair day. (source: msnbc.com, May 23, 2011)