Archive for the ‘Databases’ Category

New collection: Gothic Past

February 22, 2012

The Department of History of Art and Architecture, Trinity College Dublin has developed an open-access resource for the study of medieval Irish architecture and sculpture called Gothic Past. Funded by the Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences (IRCHSS), it highlights three major photograph research collections at Trinity College: the Stalley Collection, the Edwin Rae Collection and the Moulding Profiles Collection. The images making up Gothic Past have been a primary resource for investigations carried out as part of Reconstructions of the Gothic Past, a thematic research project carried out in the Department of History of Art and Architecture at Trinity College from 2008 -2011. The project monograph will be published in 2012 by Wordwell Books.

Occupy images

December 2, 2011

The Occupy Movement that started at Wall Street has quickly spread around the globe, aided in part by the vivid, compelling and, at times, chilling images produced by participants or (citizen) journalists. The Occupy Movement is also actively producing and syndicating some pretty amazing protest posters for distribution among its various movements through a site called OCCUPRINT: Posters form the Occupy Movement. Occupy participants can submit and share their own creations. Occuprint has established a PrintLab to generate prints for use in the protest movement (not to generate money — all prints are free).

The Visual Resources Facility has also documented the art and architecture produced by UC Davis Occupy. In our image catalog,  you can see the memorial produced by Robin Hill and her students at the campus rally (November 21) and the UC Davis encampment aka Quad Village.

Walters Art Museum going online

October 17, 2011

The Walters Art Museum is now making 10,000 of its 30,000 works available online. The digitization project, funded by NEA and NEH grants, is intended to make the entire collection available online. According to the Baltimore Sun, “the effort will put the Walters at the forefront of the emerging technology of online museums and make it one of the few institutions in the world that allows virtual visitors to explore almost every artwork it owns.” The museum maintains that their collection is in the public domain and can therefore make their high-resolution images available through a Creative Commons license. This position mirrors the Walters’ free admission policy as well. The online catalog comes with detailed information about the works, the ability to zoom and create folders. (source: Baltimore Sun, October 4, 2011)

Frick Photoarchive available online

October 13, 2011

Scholars can now look forward to accessing the Photoarchive of the Frick Art Reference Library online.  With help from the NEH and the Henry Luce Foundation, the Frick has just released a beta version of its digital image archive containing 15,000 works of art and research documentation for 125,000 works of art. The archive is accessible at images.frick.org. You can access the Frick Reference Library collection through their online catalog FRESCO.
Established to facilitate object-oriented research, the Photoarchive is a study collection of more than one million photographic reproductions of works of art from the fourth to the mid-twentieth century by artists trained in the Western tradition.  To read more about the online Photoarchive, go to the Frick press release.

Collection spotlight: Wellcome images

October 7, 2011

Wellcome Images: 2000 Years of Human Culture is “one of the world’s richest and most unique collections, with themes ranging from medical and social history to contemporary healthcare and biomedical science.” The Wellcome Collection, established by Sir Henry Wellcome to explore the connections between medicine, life and art, provide digital access to their visual materials through Wellcome Images. They currently have 40,000 high-quality digital images available. This database offers an amazing assortment of unusual and diverse material, from historical images to Tibetan Buddhist paintings, ancient Sanskrit manuscripts written on palm leaves or medical teaching devices (such as the eye defect teaching model shown here).

European Film Gateway

October 7, 2011

Billed as “your single access point to films, images and texts from selected collections of 16 film archives across Europe,” the European Film Gateway (EFG) is a newly developed online portal that provides access to European film archives and cinémathèques. EFG currently contains over 26,000 videos, 515,000 images and 10,200 textual documents. To date, 18 collections are available, including Cinecittà Luce, Cinémathèque française, Cineteca di Bologna, COLLATE, Deutsches Filminstitut, Filmarchiv Austria and Národní filmový archiv.

Réunion des Musées Nationaux images now in ARTstor

September 21, 2011

Duchesne, Cycling race, 1902

In collaboration with Réunion des Musées Nationaux (RMN) and Art Resource, ARTstor has added nearly 4,000 of a projected total 12,000 images to the Digital Library. The Réunion des Musées Nationaux (a French public establishment under the trusteeship of the French Ministry of Culture and Communication) includes 28 premier national and regional museums of France, including the Louvre and the Musée d’Orsay. The majority of images focus on works by key artists from major European schools, as well as decorative arts and furnishings from castles and royal residences throughout France. French museums with significant holdings in the arts of Asia, Africa, and Oceania are also included

Calling all compulsive taggers

August 1, 2011

© Bruce Gilden / Magnum Photos

Magnum Photos is looking for a few good taggers — 50 taggers to be exact — to participate in some crowd-source photo tagging.  Hoping to make its archives more accessible, and take advantage of the fact that many of us spend too much time in front of our computers, Magnum Photos is initiating a collaborative annotation project and is looking for volunteer taggers who love photography and want to help shape its site into an online community.  At present, Magnum has 500,000 images online but only 200,000 have information attached to them.  If you’re interested in participating, you can sign up now to become a Magnum tagger. (source: James Estrin, “Crowd-Sourcing the Magnum Archive,” Lens, July 26, 2011)

New additions to ARTstor

July 20, 2011

China Pavilion

Almost 1,300 new images of contemporary architecture in Shanghai, including the Expo 2010, have been added to ARTstor. ART on FILE photographers were sent to Shanghai by ARTstor to document the architectural highlights of this city, such as Marshall Strabala’s Shanghai Tower (the second tallest tower in the world), the Shanghai Museum (shaped like a Shang Dynasty ding), People’s Square, the Oriental Pearl Tower and the Pudong Riverside Promenade. The Expo 2010 Shanghai China collection includes images of the grounds and pavilions of the largest, most expensive and most visited Expo in the history of World’s Fairs. Among the sites captured by ART on FILE include the Urban Best Practices Area, the Denmark Pavilion (BIG, 2 + 2, and ARUP) and Poland Pavilion (Natalia Paszkowska). To read more about these additions, go here. To learn more about ARTstor’s ART on FILE collection, go here.

From here to then

July 5, 2011

Wish you could see what your favorite neighborhood in your favorite city looked like at the turn-of-the-century? A new collaborative project called SepiaTown can make that possible. SepiaTown a project that allows registered users to upload historical photographs of their favorite city, index them to Google Maps and show you a “then and now” picture of your favorite city. The makers of SepiaTown think of it as “a time machine. SepiaTown lets you use your computer or mobile device to see what the very spot you’re standing on looked like decades or centuries ago.” Registered SepiaTown users (anyone can register) can upload, map, and share historical images (film and audio coming soon) from any given location and time period with other users around the world. SepiaTown is free and content is completely user generated.