Archive for February, 2017

Happy Belated Public Domain Day!

February 6, 2017

class-of-2017-finalLast month, the Public Domain Review announced its “Class of 2017” — their top picks of artists whose works have now entered the public domain as of January 1, 2017. Among the newly free artists: André Breton, László Moholy-Nagy, Gertrude Stein, Alfred Stieglitz, Buster Keaton, and Mina Loy.

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Trump and the arts

February 6, 2017

gif by Hrag Vartanian / Hyperallergic

Want to know what the future holds for the NEA and the NEH during the Trump years?

Here is some suggested reading:

“Trump Team Plans to Eliminate National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities,” Hyperallergic, January 19, 2017
“Trump Reportedly Wants to Cut Cultural Programs that Make Up 0.02 Percent of Federal Spending,” The Washington Post, January 19, 2017
“What Trump’s Proposed Spending Cuts Could Mean for the Arts Economy,” Fortune, January 19, 2017
“Trump Reportedly Wants to Eliminate the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities,” artnet news, January 19, 2017
“NEH on the Chopping Block?”, Inside Higher Ed, January 20, 2017
“No Deal for the Arts: It’s No Surprise that Donald Trump Wants to Tell the Arts and Humanities ‘You’re Fired,'” Salon.com, January 22, 2017
CAA Statement on Government Spending Cuts for Arts and Humanities,” CAA (College Arts Association), January 23, 2017
“As Trump Threatens the NEA, an Artist Compiles LL the Projects It Funded Last Year,” Hyperallergic, January 25, 2017
“What if Trump Really Does End Money for the Arts?”, The New York Times, January 30, 2017

Why your Art History class may be the most important class you take

February 6, 2017

In “The Art of learning: Why art history might be the most important subject you could study today,” Art historian Noah Charney argues that the study of art history and a humanities-based education is more important than ever.  The emphasis placed on the study of STEM subjects can diminish the perceived value of the humanities major, leading some to view these disciplines as purely whimsical and unpractical. In fact, Charney points to John Berger and his groundbreaking book Ways of Seeing to show how Art history develops the skills that increase critical thinking which are especially important in this age of fake news and alternative facts.

Read the entire article here.