Archive for the ‘Libraries & Archives’ Category

Vatican to digitize Manuscripts

April 8, 2014

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With funding from the Polonsky Foundation, the Vatican is planning on digitize its entire Ancient Manuscript collection. Last year, the Vatican and the Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford collaborated on a massive digitization project to make 1.5 million manuscript pages from their collections accessible online. This huge endeavor is known as the Polonsky Foundation Digitization Project. And now another sponsor (NTT Data) has stepped forward, enabling the Vatican to digitize all 82,000 manuscripts in its 135 collections — 41 million pages in all!

Read the Vatican press release here.

New Rembrandt resource

September 27, 2012

Users of the Rembrandt Research Project (RRP) will be happy to know that there is a new resource available to Rembrandt scholars. The Rembrandt Database is an inter-institutional research resource for information and documentation on paintings by Rembrandt – or attributed to him, either now or in the past – in museums around the world.  This new resource consolidates all the various documentation on Rembrandt into one site with the aim of becoming the first port of call for research on Rembrandt’s paintings.  Over 20 institutions partnered with the primary sponsors RKD (Netherlands Institute for Art History) and the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis in developing the Rembrandt Database. The developers eventually hope to include the body of information and documentation collected by the RRP into the Rembrandt Database.
The website currently contains 1700 digital documents (visual and textual material) relating to 12 paintings in 3 different museums. This number will grow in the coming period with the number of contributing museums is expected to reach 20 by 2014.

Johnson Collection of historic gardens and houses now available

May 21, 2012

The Library of Congress recently announced the digitization of the Frances Benjamin Johnston lantern slide collection.  Johnston (1864-1952) was a photographer and advocate of the garden beautiful movement.  In support of this movement, Johnston toured the US and Europe during the 1910s and 1930s, presenting lectures on historic gardens and plant life. To illustrate these lectures, Johnston used her own images. She transfered 1,134 of her black and white photographs to lantern slides which she then hand-tinted so that she could illustrate her popular lectures for garden clubs, museums and horticultural societies in color. Johnston’s photographs depict more than 200 sites — primarily private gardens but also horticultural shows, a public library and museum, and several parks. The slides focus on the American East, West, and South but also include some images in Italy, France, and England.

For more on Johnston, her lectures and lantern slides, visit the Frances Benjamin Johnston Collection page at the Library of Congress.

Machiel Kiel Photographic Archive available online

May 21, 2012

The Netherlands Institute in Turkey (NIT) has launched a site making the photographic archive of Machiel Kiel, the former director of the NIT and a renowned Dutch scholar of Ottoman architectural monuments in the Balkan countries, available to the public.  Created for the most part between the 1960s and 1990s, the Kiel Photographic Archive contains visual documentation of many monuments that have not survived or have been significantly altered during the second half of the twentieth century. The publication of Kiel’s archive by the NIT is hoped to significantly advance international research on this heritage.

As of May 2012, the NIT has almost 1300 images digitized and processed pertaining to Ottoman-Islamic architectural monuments in the Southeast-European countries (outside Turkey). The next phases will process images of monuments in Turkish Thrace and  Christian monuments and mural painting from the Ottoman period.

Research grant opportunity at Columbia University

December 2, 2011

Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library

Columbia University Libraries have announce the Libraries Research Awards Program designed to facilitate research access to the Libraries’ special collections. The Libraries will award ten grants of $2,500 each to those researchers who demonstrate a compelling need to consult Columbia Libraries special collections for their work. All US citizens are welcome to apply and  preference will be given to those outside the New York City metropolitan area. The intent of the grant is to help defer the cost of visiting the Libraries for research needs.
Participating libraries and collections include: the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Burke Library at Union Theological Seminary, Butler Library, the Lehman Social Sciences Library, the Rare Book & Manuscript Library, C. V. Starr East Asian Library, and the Libraries’ Area Studies Collections.
Applications will be accepted through January 31, 2012, with research expected to be conducted at Columbia between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013. For eligibility, application guidelines, conditions, and more
information about the special collections at Columbia University, please visit the Libraries Research Awards Program.

Frick Photoarchive available online

October 13, 2011

Scholars can now look forward to accessing the Photoarchive of the Frick Art Reference Library online.  With help from the NEH and the Henry Luce Foundation, the Frick has just released a beta version of its digital image archive containing 15,000 works of art and research documentation for 125,000 works of art. The archive is accessible at images.frick.org. You can access the Frick Reference Library collection through their online catalog FRESCO.
Established to facilitate object-oriented research, the Photoarchive is a study collection of more than one million photographic reproductions of works of art from the fourth to the mid-twentieth century by artists trained in the Western tradition.  To read more about the online Photoarchive, go to the Frick press release.

Collection spotlight: Wellcome images

October 7, 2011

Wellcome Images: 2000 Years of Human Culture is “one of the world’s richest and most unique collections, with themes ranging from medical and social history to contemporary healthcare and biomedical science.” The Wellcome Collection, established by Sir Henry Wellcome to explore the connections between medicine, life and art, provide digital access to their visual materials through Wellcome Images. They currently have 40,000 high-quality digital images available. This database offers an amazing assortment of unusual and diverse material, from historical images to Tibetan Buddhist paintings, ancient Sanskrit manuscripts written on palm leaves or medical teaching devices (such as the eye defect teaching model shown here).

European Film Gateway

October 7, 2011

Billed as “your single access point to films, images and texts from selected collections of 16 film archives across Europe,” the European Film Gateway (EFG) is a newly developed online portal that provides access to European film archives and cinémathèques. EFG currently contains over 26,000 videos, 515,000 images and 10,200 textual documents. To date, 18 collections are available, including Cinecittà Luce, Cinémathèque française, Cineteca di Bologna, COLLATE, Deutsches Filminstitut, Filmarchiv Austria and Národní filmový archiv.

What does a Digital Public Library of America look like?

May 20, 2011

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) Steering Committee wants your help developing a national digital public library. To facilitate this goal, the DPLA has released Beta Sprint, an initiative that “seeks, ideas, models, prototypes, technical tools, user interfaces, etc.—put forth as a written statement, a visual display, code, or a combination of forms—that demonstrate how the DPLA might index and provide access to a wide range of broadly distributed content.” Beta Sprint is where theory merges with reality, or as Doron Weber, Steering Committee member and Vice President of the Sloan Foundation, put it, “where the dream of a seamless and comprehensive digital library for every person begins to grapple, technically and creatively, with what has already been accomplished and what still needs to be developed.” Anyone interested in participating must submit a Statement of Interest by June 15.
For more information on the Digital Public Library of America, go to their wiki.
(sources: Beta Sprint Press Release, Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard)

New resources at Shields Library

May 17, 2011

Our always helpful librarian at Shields Library, Dan Goldstein, emailed us a list of books just added to the Harvest catalog. Here are a few highlights:
The Villa of the Papyri at Herculaneum : archaeology, reception, and digital reconstruction (Shields Library DG70.H5 V56 2010); The art of tomorrow (N6497 .A78 2010); The vorticists : manifesto for a modern world (N6768.5.V6 V678 2010); Forced journeys : artists in exile in Britain c.1933-45 (N6768 .F68 2009); Undercurrents : experimental ecosystems in recent art (N6498.E26 U54 2010); Abitare : 50 years of design : the best of architecture, interiors, fashion, travel, trends (NK1390 .A25 2010); Stephen Gill, Coming up for air (TR655 .G57 2010); Ivan Vartanian, See/Saw : connections between Japanese art then and now (N7350 .V37 2011); Contemporary art in Asia : a critical reader (N7260 .C627 2011); Mazaar, Bazaar : design and visual culture in Pakistan (NC998.6.P18 M38 2009); Atlas of world interior design (NK1990 .A85 2011); Russell Abraham, California cool : residential modernism reborn (NA7235.C2 A37 2010); Representing slavery : art, artefacts and archives in the collections of the National Maritime Museum (HT985 .R46 2007); Art and phenomenology (N70 .A775 2011); Holger Hoock, Empires of the imagination : politics, war and the arts in the British world, 1750-1850 (DA485 .H66 2010); Kathleen Ashley, Being a pilgrim : art and ritual on the medieval routes to Santiago; Ansel Adams, Unseen Ansel Adams : photographs from the Fiat Lux Collection (TR655 .A323 2010).

AND please take a look at Dan’s “Digital Images” finding aids site. It’s full of really helpful links to licensed and freely available image resources for students and scholars working in the humanities. This is a great campus resource.


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