Archive for the ‘Image tools’ Category

Vatican to digitize Manuscripts

April 8, 2014

Stamp.Ross.283

Stamp.Ross.283

With funding from the Polonsky Foundation, the Vatican is planning on digitize its entire Ancient Manuscript collection. Last year, the Vatican and the Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford collaborated on a massive digitization project to make 1.5 million manuscript pages from their collections accessible online. This huge endeavor is known as the Polonsky Foundation Digitization Project. And now another sponsor (NTT Data) has stepped forward, enabling the Vatican to digitize all 82,000 manuscripts in its 135 collections — 41 million pages in all!

Read the Vatican press release here.

Collection highlight: French Revolution Digital Archive

February 26, 2014
Oath of the King, print my Carl de Vinck, Bibliothèque nationale de France

Oath of the King, print my Carl de Vinck, Bibliothèque nationale de France

In late Spring 2013, Stanford University and the Bibliothèque nationale de France joined forces to release the French Revolution Digital Archive (FRDA) online. The FRDA provides access to two main sources of material: the Archives parlementaires and a vast collection of images selected from the collections of the Bibliothèque nationale de France.  These collections originally formed “French Revolution Research Collection” produced by the Bibliothèque nationale de France and the Pergamon Press for the bicentennial of the Revolution in 1989; these collections were available on laserdisc or microfilm until the online release of the FRDA.

The FRDA contains about 12,000 individual images with detailed metadata making it the most complete searchable digital archive of French Revolution images available. The Parliamentary Archives (AP) contains primary documents. Because of copyright restrictions, FRDA contains the AP volumes covering the years 1787-1794. The FRDA can be browsed by subject and searched by artist, timeline, medium, people and collector/collector.

Collection highlight: Artsy

September 19, 2013

“Art meets science.” That’s Logo_Fullthe mantra of the Art Genome Project — the power, brains, force behind   Artsy. ” Artsy’s mission is to make all the world’s art accessible  to anyone with an Internet connection.” With 50,000+ artworks by 11,000+ artists from leading collections (500+ galleries and 100+ museums) around the world, Artsy is one of the largest online collections of contemporary art. Artsy allows users to develop online collections, research artworks and artists, and even purchase works of art (some contemporary works are for sale but not all).

The Artsy engineers of the Art Genome Project rely on open-source to map the “genes,” or characteristics, of art historical movements, subjects, formal characteristics etc. connecting artists and their works. You can explore these links and other educational content on the Artsy Education page. You can get the Artsy app here.

The perfect Pinterest picture

June 5, 2013

Aunt Peggy's Cucumber SaladWhat’s the most popular picture on Pinterest? It’s not a cute kitten or puppy. It’s not a celebrity or a beautiful sunset. No, it’s Aunt Peggy’s Cucumber, Tomato, and Onion Salad. Read more about image optimization in Pinterest and Instagram here. Note: “Aunt Peggy’s Cucumber, Tomato, and Onion Salad” recipe not included.

ImageNet

November 20, 2012

The Internet provides us with a mountain of digital images from which you can find just about anything you are looking for.  Sometimes, but not always. Why? Because an image can be found on the Internet only if the text entered by a searcher matches the text used to label it.  To help organize this heap of digital confusion, computer scientists at Stanford and Princeton are working on the world’s largest visual database that mimics the human vision system. The database called ImageNet is organized around hierarchical categories called the WordNet. Each category (node) is represented by hundreds or thousands of images — on the average over 500 images per node. ImageNet utilizes Mechanical Turk workers to identify and categorize images. At the moment, ImageNet has over 14,000,000 images indexed into nearly 22,000 categories.
For more on ImageNet, read “Seeking a Better Way to Find Web Images” (New York Times, November 19, 2012)

Rijks Studio launched

November 1, 2012

In anticipation of its reopening on April 13, 2013, the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam launched Rijks Studio, their new online presentation of 125,000 works in its collection.
“Rijks Studio invites members of the public to create their own masterpieces by downloading images of artworks or details of artworks in the collection and using them in a creative way. The ultra high-resolution images of works, both famous and less well-known, can be freely downloaded, zoomed in on, shared, added to personal ‘studios’, or manipulated copyright-free. Users can have prints made of entire works of art or details from them. Other suggestions for the use of images include creating material to upholster furniture or wallpaper, or to decorate a car or an iPad cover for example. To celebrate this digital milestone, the Rijksmuseum is asking leading international artists, designers and architects to become pioneers of Rijks Studio by selecting one work from the collection and using it creatively to create a new artwork. These will be released in the run up to the reopening of the museum.” (Press release)

World Wonders Project

June 12, 2012

Google has teamed up with UNESCO, CyArk and the World Monuments Fund to introduce an exciting new resource that allows users to virtually explore and navigate world heritage sites through panoramic street-level images. The World Wonders Project uses Google’s Street View, Panoramio and Youtube to make sites like Pompeii, ancient Kyoto and the Palace of Versailles accessible to a global audience. Users can browse by location or by themes.

Photos vulnerable on Apple mobile devices

March 6, 2012

The New York Times recently reported that applications developed by Apple for their mobile devices can access and copy user photo libraries. This bit of information was revealed shortly after it was reported that some apps were able to take user address books without their knowledge. Apps that utilize location data appear to also allow access to user photos. According to the NYT, it is uncertain if the Apple apps are illicitly copying user photos. To read the full story, go here.

NYPL’s new Stereogranimator

January 31, 2012

The New York Public Library has just released a new tool — the Stereogranimatorthat can transform historical stereographs into shareable 3D web formats. Stereoscopic photography recreates the illusion of depth by presenting two offset images separately to the left and right eye of the viewer. The 2D images are merged in the brain, creating the perception of 3D depth. The Stereogranimator allows users to select a stereoscope from the 40,000+ stereographs from NYPL’s archive and produce an anaglyph or animated gif that combines the two images into one.
For more on the stereographs and how they work, check out the Getty’s simulation.

New additions to ARTstor

July 20, 2011

China Pavilion

Almost 1,300 new images of contemporary architecture in Shanghai, including the Expo 2010, have been added to ARTstor. ART on FILE photographers were sent to Shanghai by ARTstor to document the architectural highlights of this city, such as Marshall Strabala’s Shanghai Tower (the second tallest tower in the world), the Shanghai Museum (shaped like a Shang Dynasty ding), People’s Square, the Oriental Pearl Tower and the Pudong Riverside Promenade. The Expo 2010 Shanghai China collection includes images of the grounds and pavilions of the largest, most expensive and most visited Expo in the history of World’s Fairs. Among the sites captured by ART on FILE include the Urban Best Practices Area, the Denmark Pavilion (BIG, 2 + 2, and ARUP) and Poland Pavilion (Natalia Paszkowska). To read more about these additions, go here. To learn more about ARTstor’s ART on FILE collection, go here.


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